How To Balance Our Own Moral Beliefs Against Reality Television

The modern television world has been dominated by reality TV over the ten years or so. The programs themselves differ massively. From documentary style shows, to competition based programs; reality has dominated the televisual landscape with no signs of slowing down. This is down to a couple of factors. Reality TV is cheap to make. With no professional actors needing to be paid, as well as a much smaller production crew, these shows are a lot more cost effective than bigger budget scripted television. The other factor is the increase of fame within our society. People have ambitions to be famous, even if they have no discernible talent to speak of, they hunger for it.

This has created a massive push in the number of reality shows where people from the public can get a small amount of fame. How does this effect us as a people? With so many viewers tuning in to reality TV, where often the worst aspects of human nature are broadcast for all to see, we have to begin to question the effect this might have no our own moral compasses.

In our everyday lives, through work and socialising, we interact with many people, often with vastly contrasting points of view. Within the world of reality television, where producers need to find a way of creating drama, these differences in people are often highlighted and turned into conflict between the stars of the show. When questioning our own morals of how we interact with other people, when our main entertainment is from reality TV, then we need to consider a key point. The majority of people on reality shows are playing up to the camera. One of the reasons we watch reality is to be shocked at how other people live, but this is an illusion of television. People are often pushed to become aggressive or talk behind peoples backs. It creates compelling television, and often they are well-aware of what they are doing. This does not reflect the true natures of the reality stars. It is just a public persona they have exaggerated in order to be remembered.

People are often pushed to become aggressive or talk behind peoples backs. It creates compelling television, and often they are well-aware of what they are doing. This does not reflect the true natures of the reality stars. It is just a public persona they have exaggerated in order to be remembered.

It should be noted that not all reality TV is devoid of moral standards, as there is so much diversity within the types of shows there are. But it is no secret, reality TV blurs the lines between entertainment and voyeurism. It could be said that it is a healthier way of releasing some of our darker impulses by watching these shows, but then we must ask the question, what effect does it have on the people within the shows themselves? We all have our darker sides, and reality TV can sometimes reflect these in a more concentrated way. By examining our own moral belief systems against those laid out within reality TV, we will start to see the differences and the similarities of how we view the world. We don’t have to like everyone, but accepting and even embracing the differences in people, is what makes the reality of life so much fun.

We don’t have to like everyone, but accepting and even embracing the differences in people, is what makes the reality of life so much fun.